The Black Panthers: Portraits from an Unfinished Revolution

With The Black Panthers: Portraits from an Unfinished Revolution, photojournalist Bryan Shih and historian Yohuru Williams seek to tell a nuanced story of the Black Panther Party, one different from the popular conception of gun-wielding "thugs," chiefly male, in black leather jackets and Afros with the leadership--Huey Newton, Bobby Seale and Eldridge Cleaver--centered in Oakland, Calif.

In pursuit of the rank-and-file perspective, Shih photographs and interviews Panthers or former Panthers, male and female, whose narratives express pride, humility, trauma, frustration and hope. Accompanied by essays solicited from scholars, this collection tells a more complex and sympathetic story. While not uncritical, the authors do champion an interpretation that emphasizes love and service over violence, featuring, for example, party programs like Breakfast for Schoolchildren (in more cities than just Oakland), free busing and ambulance services, free health care clinics and more. Shih's photographs are striking and expressive, capturing the "humanizing details" he sought.

The Black Panthers is not the complete story: for instance, the "deep misogyny and sexism within the rank and file and leadership" is mentioned but not really addressed. Perhaps there is no complete story--as proven here, the party was made up of diverse members, with varied goals and motivations. Shih and Williams's objective to expose this multiplicity, and inspire a second look at an energetic but ill-fated cause, is achieved with this intelligent, unapologetic book. --Julia Jenkins, librarian and blogger at pagesofjulia

Powered by: Xtenit